top of page

Heart Health

Michelle Pugle, August 2023, Healthline


A walk a day could help reduce your risk of heart rhythm disorder — also known as atrial fibrillation (AFib) — and stroke. That’s according to new research presented at the European Society of Cardiology.


Read the full story in Healthline.


Featuring interviews with:

  • Dr. Shih-Hsien Sung, PhD, study author and associate professor at National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University in Taipei, Taiwan

  • Dr. Nikhil Warrier, cardiac electrophysiologist and medical director of electrophysiology at MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, CA

  • Dr. Ernst von Schwarz, PhD, a cardiologist, professor of medicine at UCLA and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and author of "The Secrets of Immortality."



Michelle Pugle, 2023, Health.com


New research found that a majority of heart attack and stroke survivors report having high cholesterol. Nearly half of those survivors are unaware that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL cholesterol) is “bad" cholesterol. Experts recommend patients maintain awareness of cholesterol levels and work to stay within the healthy range to prevent heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.


Read the full story in Health.com. 


Featuring interiews with:

  • Yu-Ming Ni, MD, a cardiologist and lipidologist at MemorialCare Heart and Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley

  • Roger Blumenthal, MD, professor of Medicine and Kenneth Jay Pollin Professor of Cardiology, director of the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Baltimore, Maryland, and American Heart Association expert



Chronic Pain After a Heart Attack May Predict Long-Term Survival, Study Shows

Michelle Pugle, August 2023, Healthline


New research suggests a link between chronic pain during the first year after a heart attack and long-term survival. The findings show that pain was a greater indicator of risk of death after a heart attack than smoking. Greater levels of pain were associated with a greater increase in mortality risk.


Read more in Healthline.


Featuring interviews with:

  • Dr. Gregg C. Fonarow, American Heart Association expert volunteer and interim chief of UCLA’s Division of Cardiology, director of the Ahmanson-UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center, and co-director of UCLA’s Preventative Cardiology Program

  • Dr. Ernst von Schwarz, PhD, a clinical and academic cardiologist clinical professor of medicine at UCLA and author of “The Secrets of Immortality

  • Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a preventive cardiologist in New York and Bayer Aspirin partner



Michelle Pugle, September 2023, Verywell


Mitral valve replacement surgery is a procedure for replacing a too-narrow, leaking or regurgitating, or otherwise damaged mitral valve. Four mitral valves in the heart are responsible for pumping blood from your heart to the rest of your body. Factors affecting recovery include age, if it's their first valve replacement, and lifestyle. This article explores long-term considerations of mitral valve replacement surgery and details what to expect regarding follow-up appointments, recovery timeline, and possible complications.


Read the full article in Verywell.



Michelle Pugle, July 2023, Healthline


A new report finds that you may be at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease if you don’t eat enough of six key heart-healthy foods. That’s according to a study from McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences researchers at the Population Research Health Institute (PHRI).

The study was published July 6 in the European Heart Journal.


Read the full story in Healthline.


Featuring interviews with:

  • Yu-Ming Ni, MD, a cardiologist at MemorialCare Heart and Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California

  • Andy De Santis, a registered dietitian in Toronto, Canada

bottom of page